List of outlaw motorcycle clubs

List of outlaw motorcycle clubs

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Bandidos
Blue Angels
The Breed
Brother Speed
Chosen Few
Coffin Cheaters
Comanchero
Devils Diciples
Diablos
El Forastero Motorcycle Club
The Finks
Free Souls
Galloping Goose Motorcycle Club
Grim Reapers
Gypsy Joker Motorcycle Club
Hangmen Motorcycle Club
Hells Angels
Hell’s Lovers
Hessians MC
Highwaymen
Invaders
Iron Horsemen
Jus Brothers
Lone Legion
Lost Breed
Market Street Commandos


Mongols
Notorious
Outcast
Outlaws
Pagans
Peckerwoods MC
Pissed Off Bastards of Bloomington
Rebels Motorcycle Club
Rebels Motorcycle Club
Rockers
Rock Machine
Road Knights
Satan’s Sidekicks
Solo Angeles
Sons of Silence
Vagos
Warlocks
Warlocks
Wheels of Soul

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Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia or FARC is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia or FARC is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

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The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia — People’s Army (Spanish: Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia — Ejército del Pueblo, FARC–EP and FARC) are a Colombian Marxist–Leninist revolutionary guerrilla organization involved in the continuing Colombian Civil War, which began in 1964.The FARC–EP are a peasant army with a proclaimed political platform of agrarianism and anti-imperialism inspired by Bolivarianism. The FARC claim to represent the poor people of rural Colombia against the economic depredations of the ruling Colombian bourgeoisie; the political influence of the U.S. in the internal, national affairs of Colombia (i.e. Plan Colombia); neo-imperialism; the monopolization of natural resources by multinational corporations; and the Colombian government’s repressive violence (police, military, and paramilitary) against the civil populace of Colombia. The revolutionary operations of the FARC–EP are funded by kidnap to ransom, gold mining, and the production and distribution of illegal drugs.
The strength of the FARC–EP forces is indeterminate; in 2007, the FARC said they were an armed force of 18,000 men and women; in 2010, the Colombian military calculated the FARC forces comprised approximately 18,000 members, of whom 50 per cent were guerrilla combatants; and, in 2011, the President of Colombia, Juan Manuel Santos, said that the FARC–EP forces comprised fewer than 8,000 members. From 1999 to 2008 the guerrilla armies of the FARC and of the Ejército de Liberación Nacional (National Liberation Army of Colombia) controlled approximately 30–35 per cent of the national territory of Colombia. The greatest concentrations of FARC guerrilla forces are in the south-eastern regions of Colombia’s 500,000 square kilometers (190,000 sq mi) of jungle, and in the plains at the base of the Andean mountain chain.

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In 1964, the FARC–EP were established as the military wing of the Colombian Communist Party (Partido Comunista Colombiano, PCC), organized after the Columbian military attacked rural Communist enclaves in the aftermath of The Violence (La Violencia, ca. 1948–58). The FARC forces constitute the violent non-state actor (VNSA) participating in the Colombian Civil War; and formal, diplomatic recognition of the FARC as legitimate belligerent forces in the Colombian Civil War is disputed. As such, the FARC were classified as a terrorist organization by the governments of Colombia, the United States, Canada, Chile, New Zealand, and the European Union; whereas the governments of Venezuela, Brazil, Argentina, Ecuador, and Nicaragua do not classify the FARC as a terrorist organization. In 2008, the Venezuelan President, Hugo Chávez, disregarded the FARC terrorist-classification, and recognized the FARC as an army proper. President Chávez also asked the Colombian government, and their allies, to recognize the FARC as a belligerent force, because such political recognition would oblige the FARC to forego kidnap and terrorism as methods of civil war, and to abide the Geneva Convention.

United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia or AUC is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

 

United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia
The United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia, or AUC, in Spanish) was created as an umbrella organization of regional far-right paramilitary groups in Colombia, each intending to protect different local economic, social and political interests by fighting left-wing insurgents in their areas. It is estimated that it has more than 31,000 militants. The AUC has been designated a terrorist organization by many countries and organizations, including the United States and the European Union.

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The organization was formed in April 1997 and it has been alleged that it was supported covertly by elements in the Colombian government and the Colombian Armed Forces.
The AUC claimed its primary objective was to protect its sponsors and its supporters from insurgents and their activities, because the Colombian state had historically failed to do so. The AUC asserted itself as a regional and national counter-insurgency force. Former AUC leader Carlos Castaño in 2000 claimed 70 percent of the AUC’s operational costs were financed with cocaine-related earnings, the rest coming from “donations” from its sponsors. The group’s sponsors have included landowners, cattle ranchers, mining or petroleum companies and politicians.[4] The AUC has also been linked to elements within the Colombian Army with whom they maintained cooperation, including their participation in joint operatives. The Colombian military has been accused of delegating to AUC paramilitaries the task of murdering peasants and labor union leaders, among others, targeted by the group under the suspicion of allegedly being guerrilla infiltrators.
The bulk of the AUC’s blocs demobilized by early 2006 and its former top leadership was extradited to the U.S. in 2008. However, local successors such as the Black Eagles continue to exist and death threats have been made using its name. On May 8, 2008, employees of a community radio station (Sarare FM Stereo) received a message stating: “For the wellbeing of you and your loved ones, do not meddle in subjects that do not concern the radio station. AUC, Arauca”. A few days later the letters AUC were daubed on the front of their office. This threat was made due to their participation in a public meeting attended by members of a Congressional Human Rights Commission on the 27 September 2007. Here, members of the public denounced human rights abuses committed in Arauca Department by different parties to the armed conflict, including the AUC.

National Liberation Army of Colombia is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

National Liberation Army (Colombia)

The National Liberation Army (Spanish: Ejército de Liberación Nacional, ELN) is a revolutionary guerrilla army who have fought in the Colombian Civil War since it began in 1964. The ELN advocate a composite Communist ideology of Marxism and Liberation Theology; they conduct military operations throughout the national territory of Colombia; in 2010, the Colombian government calculated the ELN forces to be approximately 5,000 guerrillas. In the forty-eight-year Colombian Civil War, the National Liberation Army of Colombia is the lesser known of two Communist guerrilla armies who operate in Colombia; the other guerrilla army is the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC–EP) who are Marxist–Leninist in their approach to the national liberation of Colombia.

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History

The National Liberation Army of Colombia (Ejército de Liberación Nacional, ELN) was founded in 1964, by Fabio Vásquez Castaño and other Colombian rebels trained in Communist Cuba; upon the Vásquez Castaño death, the ELN was headed by a series of Roman Catholic priests, exponents of Liberation Theology. Most notable was the Priest Camilo Torres Restrepo (1929–66), a well-known university professor (egalitarian and Marxist) who was openly critical of the grossly unequal distribution of income among the social classes of Colombia. His attraction to the radical ideas of Liberation Theology led to joining the ELN, a guerrilla army intent upon effecting the revolutionary praxis of liberation theology among the poor people of Colombia. In the event, Father Camilo was killed in his first combat as an ELN guerrilla; and so became the exemplar ELN soldier, to be emulated by ELN guerrillas and by other liberation-theology priests from the lower ranks of the Roman Catholic priesthood.

n the 1970s, after suffering military defeat and internal crises, the ELN was commanded by the Spanish priest Father Manuel Pérez Martínez (1943–98) alias El Cura Pérez (The Priest Pérez), who shared joint-leadership with leader Nicolás Rodríguez Bautista, alias “Gabino”. From the late 1970s, The Priest Pérez presided over the National Liberation Army as one of its most recognized figures, until he died of hepatitis B in 1998. Father Manuel Pérez was instrumental to establishing the ideology of the ELN, a composite of Cuban revolutionary theory and liberation theology that proposes the establishment in Colombia of a Christian and communist régime to resolve the socio-economic problems of chronic political corruption, poverty and the political exclusion of most Colombians from the government of their country.
The ELN guerrillas survived the heavy combats of the Colombian Army’s Operation Anorí (1973–74), and then reconstituted their forces, with partial assistance from the Colombian Government of President Alfonso López Michelsen (1974–78), who allowed the ELN to break from and escape encirclement by the Colombian National Army. President López Michelsen helped the ELN in the hope of initiating peace negotiations with them in order to end the civil warfare. In the event, the National Liberation Army of Colombia resumed financing its military operations by means of kidnap for ransom and the extortion of money from Colombian and foreign petroleum companies, and by taxation of the private, Illegal drug trade of Colombia. One such hostage was the American tourist Glen Heggstad, who was on a motorcyle holiday of South America, when, in November 2001, the ELN captured him as he travelled from Bogotá to Medellín; he was held hostage for one month. After release by the ELN, Heggstad published Two Wheels Through Terror: Diary of a South American Motorcycle Odyssey (2004), an account of his travels and ELN-kidnap experience in South America; in 2007, the Heggstad “guerrilla-captive” story was re-told in an episode of the “Locked Up Abroad” television programme.
The ELN did not participate in the peace negotiations conducted between the Colombian government of President Andrés Pastrana Arango (1998–2002) and the FARC; yet did participate in an exploratory conference about possibly participating in peace negotiations. A Colombian government initiative towards granting the ELN a demilitarized zone in the southern region of the Bolívar Department was thwarted by right-wing political pressure from the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC) whose paramilitary mercenaries conduct anti-guerrilla operations in that part of the Bolívar Department.

Menace of Destruction MOD 301 Gang is now in the Philippines

Menace of Destruction MOD 301 Gang is now in the Philippines

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Menace of Destruction are a Hmong gang that came into being around 1988. Also known as Masters of Destruction or MOD, the gang was founded by former members of the Peace MOD following a break up in the Fresno County of California(around 250 miles to the north of Los Angeles). A number of other gangs were formed from the same events including the Asian Crips, Oriental Ruthless Boys(ORB) and the Mongolian Boys Society.

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The stated goals of the Mod gang are to eradicate racism and maintain dignity on the streets and they intend to represent the Bloods and Crips. Despite the stated racial equality goals most of the membership of the MOD Gang are Hmong teens who grew up with the gang culture or were later recruited to the gang. There are however a limited number of Blacks, Hispanics and Caucasians.

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List of Terrorist Organizations:

List of Terrorist Organizations:

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Abu Nidal Organization
Abu Sayyaf Group
African National Congress
Al-Aqsa e.V.
Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade
Al-Badr
al-Gama’a al-Islamiyya
Al Ghurabaa
al-Haramain Foundation
Al Ittihad Al Islamia
al-Qaeda
al-Qaeda in Iraq
al-Qaeda Organization in the Arabian Peninsula
al-Qaeda Organization in the Islamic Maghreb
Al-Shabaab
All Tripura Tiger Force
Ansar al-Islam
Ansar al-Sunna
Armed Islamic Group
Asbat al-Ansar
Aum Shinrikyo
Babbar Khalsa
Babbar Khalsa International
Baluchistan Liberation Army    [
Caucasus Emirate
Communist Party of India (Maoist)
Communist Party of the Philippines/
New People’s Army
Continuity Irish Republican Army
Cumann na mBan
Deendar Anjuman
Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine
Egyptian Islamic Jihad  [
Euskadi ta Askatasuna
Fatah
Fianna na hÉireann
Gama’a al-Islamiyya
GRAPO
Great Eastern Islamic Raiders’ Front
Hamas
Harakat-ul-Jihad-ul-Islami
Harakat-ul-Jihad-ul-Islami (Bangladesh)
Harakat ul-Mujahidin
Harakat-Ul-Mujahideen/Alami
Hezb-e Islami Gulbuddin
Hezbollah
Hezbollah External Security Organisation
Hizb ut-Tahrir


Hizbul Mujahideen
Holy Land Foundation
for Relief and Development
Hynniewtrep National Liberation Council
International Sikh Youth Federation
Irish National Liberation Army
Irish People’s Liberation Organisation
Irish Republican Army
Islamic Army of Aden
Islamic Jihad Union
Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan
Islamic Jihad Movement in Palestine
Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades
Jaish-e-Mohammed
Jamaat Ul-Furquan
Jamaat-ul-Mujahideen Bangladesh
Jamiat ul-Ansar
Jamiat-e Islami
Jemaah Islamiya
Jund Ash Sham
Jundullah
Kach and Kahane Chai
Khalistan Commando Force
Khuddam ul-Islam
Kurdistan Freedom Falcons
Kurdistan Workers’ Party
Lashkar-e-Toiba
Lashkar-e-Jhangvi
Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE)
Libyan Islamic Fighting Group
Loyalist Volunteer Force
Moroccan Islamic Combatant Group
Mujahedin-e Khalq
Muslim Brotherhood
National Democratic Front of Bodoland
National Liberation Army
National Liberation Front of Tripura
Nuclei Territoriali Antimperialisti
Orange Volunteers
Palestine Liberation Front
Palestine Liberation Organization
Palestinian Islamic Jihad
People’s Congress of Ichkeria and Dagestan
People’s Liberation Army of Manipur
People’s Revolutionary Party of Kangleipak
Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine
Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine-
General Command
Real IRA
Red Brigades for the construction
of the Combative Communist Party
Red Hand Commando
Red Hand Defenders
Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia
Revolutionary Nuclei
Revolutionary Organization 17 November
Revolutionary People’s Liberation Party/Front
Revolutionary Struggle
Saor Éire
Saviour Sect
Shining Path
Sipah-e-Sahaba Pakistan
Society of the Revival of Islamic Heritage
Stichting Al Aqsa
Students Islamic Movement of India
Supreme Military Majlis ul-Shura of the United Mujahideen Forces of Caucasus
Takfir wal-Hijra
Taliban
Tehreek-e-Nafaz-e-Shariat-e-Mohammadi
Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan
Tamil Nadu Liberation Army
Ulster Defence Association
Ulster Volunteer Force
United Liberation Front of Asom
United National Liberation Front
United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia
Vanguards of Conquest
World Tamil Movement