The Mexikanemi – Texas Mexican Mafia is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

The Mexikanemi – Texas Mexican Mafia is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

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The Mexikanemi, sometimes confused with the Mexican Mafia was founded by San Antonio natives Heriberto “Herb” Huerta and Jose Lopez in 1984. Heriberto Huerta came up with the scheme for the mafia style gang and organized it along the outline of La Cosa Nostra, the New York Italian Mafia. The prison gang is a powerful and operates in both prisons across the nation and the streets. The gang is involved in crimes such as drug trafficking, murder, extortion, robbery and loan sharking. The gang is highly organized and operates under a strict paramilitary structure. There is an estimated 17,000 Mexikanemi members in cities across the U.S. and Mexico.

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GANG PROFILE Symbols: Aztec Double-Headed Serpent, EME, 13, Merecido. Ranking structure: Paramilitary Territory: San Antonio, Austin, Laredo, Corpus Christi, Rio Grande Valley, Los Angeles CA, and small chapters across the United States and southern Mexico. . Alliances: none Members: 17,000 Racial make up: Hispanic Threat: High

MEXIKANEMI POWER STRUCTURE The structure of the Mexikanemi is comprised of three components, the members, prospects, and associates. There are also descending ports of lieutenants, sergeants and solders in the organization. These are the back bone, the doers of the deadly organization who set up the Mesa’s (the boards) which are controlling boards on the prison main lines. These boards’ members are in charge of organizing most of Mexican Mafia activity. The Mexikanemi require its members to remain loyal to the gang and vow to do so for life. Homosexuality is prohibited and so is drug abuse.

MEXIKANEMI IN PRISON The Mexikanemi rapidly multiplied in Texas after a war erupted between the Mexikanemi and the Texas Syndicate. The Texas Syndicate, which was the states only Hispanic prison gang refused to accept the Mexikanemi. While the Texas Syndicate was known for extorting nonmember Hispanics, the Mexikanemi claimed to offer all Mexican American inmates who joined their gang full protection. As a result the Mexikanemi became popular, particularly with offenders from San Antonio. The war between these two prison gangs went on for 7 years, with as many as 100 murders from both sides. The Mexikanemi and Texas Syndicate decided to settle a truce in 1988 after new prison gangs such as the Barrio Azteca and Raza Unida were emerging into the scene. Feeling that the Barrio Azteca had no right in using the Mexikanemi’s Aztlan ideology, they demanded that the Barrio Azteca change its name. The Azteca’s took great offense to their request and responded attacking dozens of Mexikanemi members across the state. The Mexikenemi retaliated by ordering the murder of 2 Barrio Azteca members at the Clemens unit in Brazoria, TX and in a federal prison in 1990. A truce between both rival gangs was made in 1997 under the condition that both gangs renew their peace treaty every year on May 5th.

THE MEXIKANEMI’S DRUG ENTERPRISE The Mexikanemi are in alliance with the Gulf cartel and control the drug trade of both Laredo and San Antonio. The Gulf Cartel sells narcotics to the Mexikanemi at discount prices as well as hires the ruthless Mexikanemi as hit men. In recent years the Mexikanemi has experienced a power struggle within its ranks and as a result has carried out dozens of execution style murders of its own members in the San Antonio area. Dozens of high ranking members of the prison gang have recently been charged for these homicides, as well as drug are trafficking and money laundering. Bexar County narcotics detectives made a recent drug bust on the cities west side. Detectives seized over 300,000 of black tar heroin at the home of 54 year old Juan Gomez, a high ranking member of the Mexikanemi. The drugs were stashed in PVC pipes hidden in the ceiling of the heavily fortified house. When questioned about the drugs, Juan Gomez refused to corporate with law enforcement agents, nor did he admit being a member of the Mexikanemi.

THE DIME While drug trafficking and robbery are the some of the prison gangs sources of income, extortion make up most of the gang’s profits. Mexikanemi foot soldiers are ordered to collect 10% off each non member drug dealer and turn in the money to Mexikanemi leaders. The “dime” as it’s called is used to support members in prison.

MEXIKANEMI INFORMANTS Using gang informants to receive intelligence about the organizations clandestine structure has been an effective tactic for law enforcement official. Some gang members are willing to cooperate in return of leniency when faced with heavy felony charges. One such informant was Rene Enriquez, a former high ranking member of the Mexikanemi. Enriquez, a Lieutenant of the gang, had been involved with the Mexikanemi for 17 years and was in charge of utilizing the gangs trust account and distributing those funds to members in the prison unit he was in charge of. He explained how he was in charge of appointing non ranking members in the streets the special task of providing his girlfriend with funds generated by drug trafficking. Enriquez’s girlfriend would then mail the money via money order into Enriquez’s prison trust fund account. It is common for gang members to trick their wives or girlfriends into doing this without telling them what they are doing is a serious crime. Such deception comes easy for Mexikanemi members since the loyalty to their organization comes first.

MEXIKANEMI VS OREJON CONFLICT The Mexikanemi is currently under going a conflict with a group called “Los Orejones”. Los Orejones, which is basically an unorganized structure of prison inmates from San Antonio, consider them selves non gang members. Inmates from San Antonio were once forcefully obligated to assist the Mexikanemi in conducting gang related crimes.

MEXIKANEMI CHRONOLOGIES OF EVENTS

The Mexikanemi, sometimes confused with the Mexican Mafia was founded by San Antonio natives Heriberto “Herb” Huerta and Jose Lopez in 1984. (Gang Intelligence 101)

In 1983, the Texas Syndicate refuses to recognize the Mexikanemi as a prison gang and declares war. Over 80 gang members are killed in an 8 year battle for control. (Gang Intelligence 101)

In 1988, the Mexikanemi declare war on the Barrio Azteca after tensions arise over a fight between both gangs in a Coffield unit recreation yard. (Gang Intelligence 101)

In 1990, the Mexikanemi and Texas Syndicate agree on a truce. (Gang Intelligence 101)

In 1992, Mexikanemi members murder a Barrio Azteca member at the Clemens unit in Brazoria, Texas. (Gang Intelligence 101)

In December 1994 Mexikanemi members murder Richard Bracknell El Paso County jail. Bracknall, a former Mexikanemi member is beat and strangled to death because he did not follow gang rules. (El Paso Times)

In 1995, 2 members of the Aryan Circle are stabbed by the Mexikanemi in a prison yard fight at the J.B. Connally unit in Kenedy, Texas.

On February 14, 1996, the Texas based Mexikanemi and California Mexican Mafia declare war on each other after members of the Mexican Mafia stab 2 members of the Mexikanemi at the United States Penitentiary in Florence, Colorado. (Gang Intelligence 101)

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In December of 1996, The Aryan Circle and Mexikanemi agree on a peace treaty over a war that resulted in 13 murders in units across Texas.

On June of 1997, the Mexikanemi and Barrio Azteca settle a peace agreement and organize a commission called “La Mesa Grande” at the Cofield unit between high ranking members of the Mexikanemi, Texas Syndicate and Barrio Azteca. (Gang Intelligence 101)

In August 1997, Mexikanemi members raid the house of a drug dealer who refused to pay the gang 10% of their drug earnings. Five people are blindfolded, bound with duct tape and shot repeatedly execution style. (Associated Press)

On January 29, 1998, leaders of the Mexikanemi and Mexican Mafia declared peace with each other. (Gang Intelligence 101)

In 1998, another federal indictment results in the conviction of Mexikanemi General Robert “Beaver” Perez. Perez is sentenced to death for 19 execution style murders committed in 1994 – 1997.

In November 1999, Mexikanemi members raid the house of Juanita Ybarra, then strangle her to death with a telephone cord. A contract was put on her life after she refused to pay the Mexikenemi a 10% cut of her marijuana dealing profits. Vasquez v State, 67 S.W.3d 229 (Tex. Crim. App., 2002)

In 1999, the Mexikanemi declares war on the Raza Unida over a conflict involving drugs in the streets of Corpus Christi, Texas. A member of the Raza Unida is brutally murdered at the Connally unit in Kenedy, Texas by Mexikanemi members. (Gang Intelligence 101)

On September 14, 2000, members of the HPL “Hermandad Pistoleros Latinos” murder Mexikanemi member Adrian Torres in San Antonio, Texas over a cocaine deal gone bad. Saenz v. State, 131 S.W.3d 43 (TX, 2003)

In 2000, both the Mexikanemi and Raza Unida settle on a truce after 1 year of war fare. (Gang Intelligence 101)

On March 1, 2001, Mexikanemi members in the Michael Unit of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice kill inmate Rogelio Garza for stealing money and heroin from the gang. Loredo v. State, No. 12-06-00287-CR (Tex. App. 8/22/2007) (Tex. App., 2007)

In July of 2004, Federal investigators freeze the prison trust fund accounts of Mexikanemi founder Heriberto “Herb” Huerta and vice president Benito “Viejito” Alonzo. Officials suspect that the $23,000 both gang members had in their trust fund was money raised from illegal activity.

On August 2004 Bexar County Sheriff detectives arrest 26 Mexikanemi members and associates on federal drug, firearms and money laundering charges. (Associated Press)

On January 15, 2005, two members of the Mexikanemi are arrested in Laredo, Texas for the brutal murders of Roberto Patino and Enrique Botello. The killers reportedly kidnapped the victims, gunned them down, and then burned their bodies in the trunk of a car. The prison gang ordered the murders in retaliation for money owed by the victims. Gallardo v. State, No. 4-06-00057-CR (Tex. App. 7/25/2007) (Tex. App., 2007)

On March 2007, Robert “Beaver” Perez, leader of the Mexikanemi is executed by the state of Texas for his involvement of over 19 gang related murders. (Associated Press)

In early 2008, a mass grave is discovered in an Atascosa County ranch and law enforcement officials link the murders to the Mexikanemi. (San Antonio Express News)

In 2008, dozens of Mexikanemi leaders are arrested on racketeering charges that involve more than 20 execution style murders in San Antonio, Austin and Atascosa County. (San Antonio Express News)

In 2007, Mexikanemi member Robert Anthony Martinez Perez is scheduled for lethal injection for his role in the 1994 execution style murder of fellow member Luis “Blue” Adames. The killing came as a result of a power struggle with in higher ranks of the gang. (San Antonio Express News)

Logan Heights Gang is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

Logan Heights Gang is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

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The Logan Heights gang is a Sureño street gang based in Southeast San Diego.

History

The Logan Heights gang was established in Southeast San Diego during the 1960s, when several individual Mexican-American street gangs from the neighborhoods of Barrio Logan, Logan Heights, and Memorial unified. Currently the gang is composed of four main subsets (Red Steps, 30th Street, 33rd Street, Logan Heights 13) that operate within these neighborhoods. There is also a small subset called Logan Heights Clicka that operates within the Colina del Sol neighborhood of the City Heights district in San Diego.

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Although they are based in San Diego, the influence of the gang has spread to other cities in the United States (Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Denver, Minneapolis, and Lakewood, Washington[1]) and to Tijuana, Mexico. Membership is not restricted to Mexican-Americans, and the gang has included Mexican nationals, members from other Hispanic cultures, Native Americans, and whites.

The Logan Heights gang has been an allied to the Tijuana Cartel (Arellano-Félix Organization) over the Tijuana smuggling route to the border city of San Diego, California. The alliance between Tijuana cartel and the gang began On November 8, 1992 when Hector Palma Salazar struck out against the Tijuana Cartel at a disco in Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, where eight Tijuana Cartel members were killed in the shootout, the Arellano-Félix brothers having successfully escaped from the location with the assistance of Logan Heights gangster David ”D” Barron.[2]

In retaliation, the Logan Heights and the Tijuana Cartel attempted to set up Mexican drug lord “chapo” Guzmán at Guadalajara airport on May 24, 1993. In the shootout that followed, six civilians were killed by the hired gunmen from the gang.[2] The deaths included that of Roman Catholic Cardinal Juan Jesús Posadas Ocampo. The church hierarchy originally believed Ocampo was targeted as revenge for his strong stance against the drug trade. However, Mexican officials believe Ocampo just happened to be caught in cross fire.[3][4][5] The Cardinal arrived at the airport in a white Mercury Grand Marquis town car, known to be popular amongst drug barons, making it a target. Intelligence received by Logan Heights gang leader David ”D” Barron was that Guzmán would be arriving in a white Mercury Grand Marquis town car.[3][4][5] This explanation, however, is often countered due to Ocampo having been wearing a long black cassock and large pectoral cross, as well as him sharing no similarity in appearance with Guzmán and having been gunned down from only two feet away.[2]

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The Logan Heights gang also has close ties to the Tijuana Cartel and Mexican Mafia. Enemies of the gang include several San Diego County gangs (most notably Barrio Sherman, Varrio Shelltown, and Old Town National City), and gangs from North Hollywood, Los Angeles.

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Los Zetas Drug Cartel is now in the Philippines (Filipinas) and Worldwide

Los Zetas Drug Cartel is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)and Worldwide

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Founded 1999 (independent cartel since February 2010)
Founding location Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico
Years active 1999-present
Territory Mexico: Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, Veracruz, Tabasco, Campeche, Yucatán, Quintana Roo,
San Luis Potosí, Chiapas, Puebla, Tlaxcala, Hidalgo, Querétaro, Zacatecas, Durango, Chihuahua, Guerrero, Oaxaca, Guanajuato, Aguascalientes, State of México, Michoacán
United States: Texas, California, New Jersey, Detroit, Colorado, Illinois
Central America: Guatemala
Europe: Italy
Asia: Philippines
Ethnicity Predominantly Mexican, with some Guatemalan members
Criminal activities Drug trafficking, people smuggling, kidnapping, racketeering, murder, arms trafficking, terrorism, extortion, assault, rape
Allies Beltrán-Leyva Cartel, Juárez Cartel, Tijuana Cartel, ‘Ndrangheta.
Rivals Gulf Cartel, Sinaloa Cartel, La Familia Michoacana, Knights Templar Cartel

Los Zetas (Zetas, Zs) is a powerful and violent criminal syndicate in Mexico, and is considered by the U.S. government to be the “most technologically advanced, sophisticated, and dangerous cartel operating in Mexico.”The origins of Los Zetas date back to 1999, when commandos of the Mexican Army’s elite forces deserted their ranks and decided to work as the armed wing of the Gulf Cartel, a powerful drug trafficking organization. In February 2010, Los Zetas broke away from their former employer and formed their own criminal organization.

Due to their military background, Los Zetas are well armed, highly organized and equipped;their brutal tactics, which include beheadings, torture and indiscriminate slaughter, show that they often prefer brutality over bribery.Los Zetas are also Mexico’s largest drug cartel in terms of geographical presence, overtaking its bitter rival, the Sinaloa Cartel. Besides drug trafficking, Los Zetas operate through protection rackets, assassinations, extortion, kidnappings, and other criminal activities. The organization is based in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, directly across the border from Laredo, Texas.

History
Etymology
The group’s name Los Zetas is given after its first commander, Arturo Guzmán Decena, whose Federal Judicial Police radio code was “Z1″, a code given to high-ranking officers. The radio code for Commanding Federal Judicial Police Officers in México was “Y” and are nicknamed Yankees, for Federal Judicial Police in charge of a city the radio code was “Z,” and thus they were nicknamed as the letter in Spanish, “Zetas.”

Foundation
After Osiel Cárdenas Guillén took full control of the Gulf Cartel in 1999, he found himself in a violent turf war. In order to keep his organization and leadership, Cárdenas sought out Arturo Guzmán Decena, a retired Army lieutenant who lured more than 30 army deserters of the Mexican Army’s elite Grupo Aeromóvil de Fuerzas Especiales (GAFE) to become his personal bodyguards, and later, as his mercenary wing. These Army deserters were enticed with salaries much higher than those of the Mexican Army. Cárdenas’ goal was to protect himself from rival drug cartels and from the Mexican military.

Once Osiel Cárdenas Guillen consolidated his position and supremacy, he expanded the responsibilities of Los Zetas, and as years passed, they became much more important for the Gulf Cartel. The Zetas began to organize kidnappings,protection rackets, extortion, securing cocaine supply and trafficking routes known as plazas (zones) and executing its foes, often with barbaric savagery.

Guzmán Decena (Z1) was killed by a rival cartel member on November 2002 in a restaurant in Matamoros, Tamaulipas,allowing Heriberto Lazcano (Z3) to ascend to the apex of the paramilitary group. In response to the rising power of the Gulf Cartel, the rival Sinaloa Cartel established a heavily armed, well-trained enforcer group known as Los Negros. The group operated similar to Los Zetas, but with less complexity and success. Upon the arrest of the Gulf Cartel boss Osiel Cárdenas Guillen in March 2003 and his extradition in 2007, the Zetas took a more active leadership role within the Gulf Cartel and their influence grew greater within the organization.

In 2010, however, Los Zetas and the Gulf Cartel broke apart.

Their operatives now include corrupt former federal, state, and local police officers, as well as ex-Kaibiles, the Special Forces of the Guatemalan military

Los Zetas have set up camps to train recruits as well as corrupt ex-federal, state, and local police officers. In September 2005 testimony to the Mexican Congress from the then-Defense Secretary Clemente Vega, indicated that the Zetas had also hired at least 30 former Kaibiles from Guatemala to train new recruits because the number of former Mexican special forces men in their ranks had shrunk. Los Zetas’ training locations have been identified as having a similar setup as military GAFE training facilities.

Territory
Analysts indicate that the Zetas are the largest organized crime group in Mexico in terms of geographical presence.
Los Zetas are primarily based in the border region of Nuevo Laredo, with hundreds more throughout the country. They have placed lookouts at arrival destinations such as airports, bus stations and main roads. In addition to conducting criminal activities along the border, they operate throughout the Gulf of Mexico, in the southern states of Tabasco, Yucatán, Quintana Roo, and Chiapas, and in the Pacific Coast states of Guerrero, Oaxaca, and Michoacán, as well as in Mexico City.

They are also active in several states in the United States. The cartel also has important areas of operation in the country of Guatemala, they are active in Texas, other U.S. states and in Italy with the ‘Ndrangheta.
Early in 2012 it has been reported that ‘Los Zetas’ are operating in the northern Venezuela–Colombia border, and have teamed up with the Colombian outfit called Los Rastrojos. Together they control the drug trafficking routes in the Colombian La Guajira and the Venezuelan state of Zulia, Colombia as the producing country and Venezuela as the main port route toward the U.S. and Europe.

Alliances and rivalries
Indications of the broken alliance between the Gulf Cartel and Los Zetas began in September 2009. On 24 February 2010, gunmen onboard hundreds of trucks marked C.D.G, XXX, and M3 (the insignias of the Gulf Cartel), clashed against Zetas gunmen on the northern cities of Tamaulipas state. The clash between these two groups started in Reynosa, Tamaulipas, and then expanded to Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros. The war then spread out through 11 municipalities of Tamaulipas, 9 of them bordering the state of Texas. Soon, the violence between these two cartels spread to Tamaulipas’ neighboring states of Nuevo León and Veracruz. Their conflict also spread to U.S. soil, where Gulf Cartel hit men killed two Zeta members in Brownsville, Texas on 5 October 2010.

Confrontations between these two groups temporarily paralyzed entire cities in broad daylight. Several witnesses claimed that many of the municipalities throughout Tamaulipas were “war zones,” and that many businesses and houses were burned down, leaving areas in “total destruction.” In the midst of violence and panic, Mexican local authorities and mass media tried to minimize the situation and claimed that “nothing was occurring,” but the facts were impossible to cover up.

The complexity and territorial advantage of Los Zetas forced the Gulf Cartel to seek an alliance with the Sinaloa Cartel and, the now disbanded, La Familia Cartel. Consequently, Los Zetas joined forces with the Beltrán Leyva Cartel and the Tijuana Cartel to counteract the opposing cartels.

Since February 2010, the major cartels have aligned in two factions, one integrated by the Juárez Cartel, Tijuana Cartel, Los Zetas and the Beltrán-Leyva Cartel??; the other faction integrated by the Gulf Cartel, Sinaloa Cartel and La Familia Cartel.

Anonymous’ Operation Cartel
On 6 October 2011 a man identified himself as a member of Anonymous posted a video on YouTube under the account MrAnonymousguyfawkes stating that Los Zetas had kidnapped one of their group members and demanded Los Zetas Cartel release the individual. If he was not freed, the man in the video threatened to expose photos and the names of several people who collaborate with the cartel, such as police officers and taxi drivers. The man in the video stated that they were “fed up” with the situation in Mexico where people are getting kidnapped and experiencing violence.

The operation to expose information of people who work with Los Zetas, dubbed “Operation Cartel”, was reportedly started as a result of an Anonymous member being kidnapped during Operation Paperstorm in Veracruz, a once peacefulcity. On 29 October 2011 the Global Intelligence group Stratfor released a report stating that if Anonymous did go through with OpCartel, most certainly it would lead to more deaths and could leave bloggers and others open to reprisal attacks by the cartels. Meanwhile, a retired head of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in Puerto Rico, Mike Vigil, warned that “Los Zetas should take Anonymous seriously.”

OpCartel also raised the concern that Los Zetas have experts in computer intelligence who are believed to track down the “anti-cartel” campaigns online, which helps experts understand the high rate of journalist executions. Additionally, the Mexican drug cartels generally have people monitor forums, news websites, and blogs to help them be in touch with what is being published and with what could affect their interests. The New York Times mentioned that Los Zetas has access to sophisticated tracking software due to the fact that they have infiltrated Mexican law enforcement agencies, and that online anonymity might not be enough protection for Internet users.

On 4 November 2011, Anonymous posted on the Iberoamerican Blog that the kidnapped member had been released and that they had confirmed his identity. They also stated that they would not be moving forward with releasing the information they had of several cartel members

Gulf Cartel is now in the Philippines (Filipinas) and Worldwide

Gulf Cartel is now in the Philippines (Filipinas) and Worldwide

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Founded 1970s
Founding location Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico
Years active 1970s-present
Territory Mexico:
Tamaulipas, Veracruz, Nuevo León
United States:
Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Illinois, Florida
Ethnicity Mexican, Guatemalan
Criminal activities Drug trafficking, people smuggling, money laundering, extortion, kidnapping, racketeering, theft, murder, arms trafficking, bribery, prostitution, counterfeiting, police impersonation.
Allies Sinaloa Cartel, Knights Templar
Rivals Los Zetas, Juárez Cartel, Beltrán-Leyva Cartel, Tijuana Cartel, Los Negros

The Gulf Cartel (Spanish: Cártel del Golfo, Golfos, or CDG) is a criminal syndicate and drug trafficking organization in Mexico, and perhaps the oldest organized crime group in the country. It is currently based in Matamoros, Tamaulipas, directly across the border from Brownsville, Texas.

Their network is international, and are believed to have dealings with crime groups in Europe, West Africa, Asia, Central America, South America, and the United States. Besides drug trafficking, the Gulf Cartel operates through protection rackets, assassinations, extortions, kidnappings, and other criminal activities. The Gulf Cartel is known for intimidating the population and for being “particularly violent.”

Although its founder Juan Nepomuceno Guerra smuggled alcohol in small quantities to the United States during the epoch of Prohibition, it was not until the 1970s that the cartel was formed and shifted to drug trafficking —primarily cocaine— under the command of Juan Nepomuceno Guerra and Juan García Ábrego.
History
Foundation: 1970s–1996
Juan Nepomuceno Guerra began smuggling alcohol across the border into
the United States during the Prohibition era; once it ended in 1933, he created a criminal syndicate (known as el cártel de Matamoros) and controlled gambling houses, a car theft network, prostitution rings, and other illegal smuggling. Nonetheless, it was not until the 1970s when his nephew Juan García Ábrego founded the Gulf Cartel and started to dedicate primarily to drug trafficking. The origins of the cartel are accredited to the legendary contrabandist Juan Nepomuceno Guerra, who died on 12 July 2001 due to a cardiac arrest. Juan Nepomuceno Guerra was considered a high-profile leader among several people in the community of Matamoros, Tamaulipas because he would help the neediest and would punish those who committed any abuse to the poor families. Poor people sometimes even made huge lines in ‘Piedras Negras,’ a restaurant of Nepomuceno Guerra, to ask him for favors.
Juan Nepomuceno Guerra, founder of the organization.Although it was never proven that he smuggled liquor, arms, tobacco, and even drugs, Juan is considered the “godfather” of the Gulf Cartel. Along with his two brothers Arturo and Roberto, Juan Nepomuceno Guerra started smuggling alcohol into the United States in the 1930s.Soon after the conclusion of the Prohibition, Don Juan, as he was widely known, dedicated himself to another completely different illicit occupation—drug trafficking. Nepomuceno Guerra also amplified his ascendancy through the incorporation of gambling houses, prostitution, human trafficking, and car theft. His nephew, Juan García Ábrego, worked along his tutelage, and slowly began taking over the drug business in the 1970s.

By the 1980s, García Ábrego began incorporating cocaine into the drug trafficking operations, and started to have the upper hand on what was now considered the Gulf Cartel, the greatest criminal dynasty in the US-Mexico border.By negotiating with the Cali Cartel, García Ábrego was able to secure 50% of the shipment out of Colombia as payment for delivery, instead of the $1,500 USD per kilo they were previously receiving. This renegotiation, however, forced Garcia Ábrego to guarantee the product’s arrival from Colombia to its destination. Instead, he created warehouses along the Mexican’s northern border to preserve hundreds of tons of cocaine; this allowed him to create a new distribution network and increase his political influence. In addition to trafficking drugs, García Ábrego would ship cash to be laundered, in the millions. Around 1994, it was estimated that the Gulf Cartel handled as much as “one-third of all cocaine shipments” into the United States from the Cali Cartel suppliers. During the 1990s, the PGR, the Mexican attorney general’s office, estimated that the Gulf Cartel was “worth over $10 billion US dollars.”

After the apprehension of García Ábrego in 1996, a power vacuum was left and several top members fought for leadership until Osiel Cárdenas Guillén became the undisputed leader. As confrontations with rival groups heated up, Osiel Cárdenas sought and recruited over 30 deserters of the Mexican Army’s elite Grupo Aeromóvil de Fuerzas Especiales (GAFE) to form part of the cartel’s armed wing. Los Zetas, as they are known, served as the hired private mercenary army of the Gulf Cartel. Nevertheless, after the arrest and extradition of Osiel Cárdenas, internal struggles led to a rupture between the two.

Osiel Cárdenas’ brother, Antonio Cárdenas Guillén, and Jorge Eduardo Costilla Sánchez, a former policeman, filled in the vacuum and became the leaders of the Gulf Cartel. The death of Tony Tormenta, the nickname given to Antonio Cárdenas for his explosive behavior, allowed for Costilla Sánchez to become the co-leader of the Gulf Cartel and head of the Metros, one of the two factions within the Gulf Cartel. Mario Cárdenas Guillén, brother of Osiel and Antonio, is the other leader of Gulf Cartel and head of the Rojos, the other faction within the Gulf Cartel and the parallel version of the Metros.

Presence in the U.S.The Gulf Cartel has important cells operating inside the United States—in Mission, Roma, and Rio Grande City—for example, and their presence is expanding. Thomas A. Shannon, a U.S. diplomat and ambassador, stated that criminal organizations like the Gulf Cartel have “substantially weakened” the institutions in Mexico and Central America, and have generated a surge of violence in the United States. The U.S. National Drug Threat Assessment mentioned that the drug trafficking organizations like the Gulf Cartel tend to be less structured in U.S. than in Mexico, and often rely on street gangs to operate inside the United States. The arrest of several Gulf Cartel lieutenants, along with the drug-related violence and kidnappings, have raised concerns among Texan officials that the drug war in Mexico and the drug cartels are taking hold in Texas. The strong ties the Gulf Cartel has with the prison gangs in the United States have also raised concern to American officials.Reports mention that Mexican drug cartels operate in more than 1,000 cities in the United States.
Samuel Flores Borrego, former Gulf Cartel high-ranking member.The debates over whether the violence in the McAllen metropolitan area should be considered an actual “spillover” from Mexico’s drug war reignited when a sheriff from Hidalgo County, Texas was wounded in a shooting with members of the Gulf Cartel. According to the sheriff, after the death of Flores Borrego, drug dealers traced a stolen load of narcotics from a circle of sellers in Elsa, Texas, and sanctioned a prison gang known as Partido Revolucionario to pretend to buy the drugs from the sellers in order to learn the location of the stash house. The plan did not go as expected, and the hired gang members kidnapped the drug dealers. Consequently, the sheriff received a anonymous call about a alleged kidnapping and tracked down the criminals, who shot and wounded him. After this incident, Todd Staples, a Republican party Commissioner of the Texas Department of Agriculture, set up a website asking the federal government to back state efforts to curb illegal activities along the Mexican border, and especially drug trafficking. With the support of two retired U.S. generals, Staples announced that Mexican drug cartels are seeking to create their own turf in the United States, but especially on the South Texas, which they consider “vulnerable.” Henry Cuellar, a Democratic party member and a U.S. Representative, strongly disagreed with Staples’ assessment that the Texas border is a war zone or an area overrun by the Mexican criminal groups, and claimed that such claims simply create “confusion” and unnecessary alarmist reactions.

On early November 2011, Greg Abbott, the Texas Attorney General, informed media outlets of a letter he sent to President Barack Obama on his failure to protect the border, and warned him that the drug violence from Mexico isincreasingly “spilling over” the border, and urged Obama to “immediately dedicate more manpower to border security.” In the letter, Abbott wrote about the shootings and kidnappings that have been occurring in the Rio Grande Valley, and how these incidents are a “threat to national security.” Lupe Treviño, the sheriff that was wounded, disagreed with Abbott’s statements in a meeting at the White House with several Department of Homeland Security agencies and Janet Napolitano, and claimed that he has implemented a four-step program designed to have all of his deputies undergo a special tactical training designed to apply SWAT-style techniques to tackle any violence along the border. He explicitly said that the “[U.S] border is not in chaos,” and that the claims by the Republicans were “untrue and unfairly painted.”Nevertheless, Carlos Cascos, the current Cameron County judge, questioned Treviño’s comments through Facebook, and mentioned that if South Texas didn’t have drug violence issues (as Treviño claimed in Washington), then Treviño’s travel to Washington D.C. was completely unnecessary, which indicates that the sheriff’s actions contradicted his statements.

Presence in Europe
The Gulf Cartel is believed to have ties with the ‘Ndrangheta, an organized crime group in
Italy that also has ties with Los Zetas. Reports indicated that the Gulf Cartel was using the BlackBerry smartphones to communicate with ‘Ndrangheta, since the texts are “normally difficult to intercept.” In 2009, the Gulf organization concluded that expanding their market opportunities in Europe, combined with the euro strength against the U.S. dollar, justified establishing an extensive network in that continent. The main areas of demand and drug consumption are in Eastern Europe, the successor states of the Soviet Union. In Western Europe, the primarily increase has been in the use of cocaine. Along with the market in the United States, the drug market in Europe is among the most lucrative in the world, where the Mexican drug cartels are believe to have deals with the mafia groups of Europe.

Presence in Africa
The Gulf Cartel and other Mexican drug trafficking groups are active in the northern and western parts of Africa.Although cocaine is not grown in Africa, Mexican organizations, such as the Gulf Cartel, are currently exploiting West Africa’s struggling rule-of-law caused by war, crime and poverty, in order to stage and expand supply routes to the increasingly lucrative European illegal drug market.

In 2003, the arrest of several high-profile cartel leaders, including the heads of the Tijuana Cartel and Gulf Cartel, Benjamín Arellano Félix and Osiel Cárdenas, turned the war on drugs into a trilateral war. While in prison, Cárdenas and Arellano Félix formed an alliance to defend themselves from the Sinaloa and Juarez Cartel, who had also formed an alliance with each other, and were planning to take over the smuggling routes and territories of the Gulf and Tijuana Cartel. After a dispute, however, Osiel Cardenas ordered Benjamin Arellano Felix beaten, and the Gulf-Tijuana alliance ceased to exist at that point. It was reported that after the fallout, Cárdenas ordered Los Zetas to Baja California to wipe out the Tijuana Cartel.

The Sinaloa-Juarez alliance ceased to exist as well due to an unpaid debt in 2007, and now the Sinaloa and Juarez Cartel are at war against each other.Since February 2010, the major cartels have aligned in two factions, one integrated by the Juárez Cartel, Tijuana Cartel, Los Zetas and the Beltrán-Leyva Cartel; the other faction integrated by the Gulf Cartel, Sinaloa Cartel, La Familia Cartel (now extinct) and the Knights Templar Cartel.

Juárez Drug Cartel is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

Juárez Drug Cartel is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

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Founding location Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico
Years active 1970–present
Territory Mexico:
Chihuahua.
United States:
Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, New Mexico
Ethnicity Mexican
Criminal activities Drug trafficking, people smuggling, money laundering, extortion, kidnapping, racketeering,
murder, arms trafficking, bribery.
Allies La Linea (armed wing)
Rivals Sinaloa Cartel

The Juárez Cartel (Spanish: Cártel de Juárez), also known as the Vicente Carrillo Fuentes Organization, is a Mexican drug cartel based in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico, across the border from El Paso, Texas.

The cartel is one of several ruthless drug trafficking organization that has been known to decapitate their rivals,mutilate their corpses and dump them in public places to instill fear not only to the general public, but to locallaw enforcement and their rivals, the Sinaloa Cartel. The Juárez Cartel has an armed wing known as La Línea, a Juarez street gang that usually performs the executions.

The Juárez Cartel was the dominant player in the center of the country, controlling a large percentage of the cocaine traffic from Mexico into the United States. The death of Amado Carrillo Fuentes in 1997, however, was the beginning of the decline of the Juárez cartel, as Carrillo relied on ties to Mexico’s top-ranking drug interdiction officer, division general Jesús Gutiérrez Rebollo.

In September 2011, the Mexican Federal Police informed that the cartel is now known as “Nuevo Cartel de Juárez” (New Juárez Cartel). It is alleged that the ‘New Juárez Cartel’ is responsible of recent executions in Ciudad Juárez and Chihuahua.

 

History
The cartel was founded in the 1970s by Rafael Aguilar Guajardo and handed down to Amado Carrillo Fuentes in 1993 under the tutelage of his uncle. Amado brought his brothers in and later his son into the business. After Amado died in 1997 following complications from plastic surgery, a brief turf war erupted over the control of the cartel, where Amado’s brother —Vicente Carrillo Fuentes— emerged as leader after defeating the Muñoz Talavera brothers.

Vicente Carrillo Fuentes, who remains in control of the cartel, then formed a partnership with Juan José Esparragoza Moreno, his brother Rodolfo Carrillo Fuentes, his nephew Vicente Carrillo Leyva,Ricardo Garcia Urquiza, and formed an alliance with other drug lords such as Ismael “Mayo” Zambada in Sinaloa and Baja California, the Beltrán Leyva brothers in Monterrey, and Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán in Nayarit, Sinaloa and Tamaulipas.

When Vicente took control of the cartel, the organization was in flux. The death of Amado created a large power vacuum in the Mexican underworld. The Carrillo Fuentes brothers became the most powerful organization during the 1990s while Vicente was able to avoid direct conflict and increase the strength of the Juárez Cartel. The relationship between the Carrillo Fuentes clan and the other members of the organization grew unstable towards the end of the 1990s and into the 2000s. During the 1990s and early 2000s, drug lords from contiguous Mexican states forged an alliance that became known as ‘The Golden Triangle Alliance’ or ‘La Alianza Triángulo de Oro’ because of its three-state area of influence: Chihuahua, south of the U.S. state of Texas, Durango and Sinaloa. However, this alliance was broken[when?] after the Sinaloa Cartel drug lord, Joaquín Guzmán Loera (aka: Shorty), refused to pay to the Juarez Cartel for the right to use some smuggling routes into the U.S.

In 2001 after Joaquín Guzmán Loera ‘El Chapo’ escaped from prison, many Juárez Cartel members defected to Guzmán Loera’s Sinaloa Cartel. In 2004, Vicente’s brother was killed allegedly by order of Guzmán Loera. Carrillo Fuentes retaliated by assassinating Guzmán’s brother in prison. This ignited a turf war between the two cartels, which was more or less put on hold from 2005-2006 because of the Sinaloa Cartel’s war against the Gulf Cartel.

After the organization collapsed, some elements of it were absorbed into the Sinaloa Cartel, an aggressive organization that has gobbled up much of the Juárez Cartel’s former territory. The Juárez Cartel has been able to either corrupt or intimidate high ranking officials in order to obtain information on law enforcement operatives and acquire protection from the police and judicial systems.

The Juárez cartel has been found to operate in 21 Mexican states and its principal bases are Culiacán, Monterrey, Ciudad Juárez, Ojinaga, Mexico City, Guadalajara, Cuernavaca and Cancún. Vicente Carrillo Fuentes remains the leader of the cartel. Members of the cartel were implicated in the serial murder site in Ciudad Juárez that wasdiscovered in 2004 and has been dubbed the House of Death.[15] The Juárez Cartel was featured battling the rival Tijuana Cartel in the 2000 motion picture Traffic. The Australian ABC documentary La Frontera (2010) described social impact of the cartel in the region.

Since 2007, the Juárez Cartel has been locked in a vicious battle with its former partner, the Sinaloa Cartel, for control of Juárez. The fighting between them has left thousands dead in Chihuahua state. The Juárez Cartel relies on two enforcement gangs to exercise control over both sides of the border: La Linea, a group of corrupt (current and former) Chihuahua police officers, is prevalent on the Mexican side, while the Barrio Azteca street gang operates in Mexico and in Texan cities such as El Paso, Dallas and Austin, as well as in New Mexico and Arizona. On July 15, 2010, the Juarez Cartel escalated violence to a new level by using a car bomb to target federal police officers.

In September 2011 banners were displayed, publicing the return of the extinct cartel. They were signed by Cesar “El Gato” Carrillo Leyva, who appears to be the son or a close relative of the late drug lord Amado Carrillo Fuentes.

Prior to 2012, the Juárez Cartel controlled one of the primary transportation routes for billions of dollars worth of illegal drug shipments annually entering the United States from Mexico. Since then, however, control of these areas has shifted to the Sinaloa Cartel.

Current alliances

Since March 2010, the major cartels have aligned in two factions, one integrated by the Juárez Cartel, Tijuana Cartel, Los Zetas and the Beltrán-Leyva Cartel; the other faction integrated by the Gulf Cartel, Sinaloa Cartel and La Familia Cartel.

Norte del Valle Colombian Drug Cartel is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

Norte del Valle Colombian Drug Cartel is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

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Norte del Valle Cartel Years active Late 1990s-present
Territory Valle del Cauca department of Colombia
Ethnicity Colombian
Criminal activities Illegal drugs trade

The Norte del Valle Cartel, or North Valley Cartel, is a drug cartel that operates principally in the north of the Valle del Cauca department of Colombia. It rose to prominence during the second half of the 1990s, after the Cali Cartel and the Medellín Cartel fragmented, and is known as one of the most powerful organizations in the illegal
drugs trade.

 

Activities
According to Diego Montoya’s Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) profile, the U.S. government accuses him of being involved in the willing production and distribution of multiple tons of cocaine into the United States. It also considers him and his organization as heavily relying on violence enjoying the protection of both right-wing and left-wing illegal armed groups classified as terrorist organizations by the U.S. government.

According to a 2004 U.S. Government Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) indictment, between 1990 and 2004, the Norte del Valle cartel exported more than 1.2 million pounds – or 500 metric tons – of cocaine worth in excess of $10 billion from Colombia to Mexico and ultimately to the United States for resale.

The indictment charges that the Norte del Valle cartel used violence and brutality to further its goals, including the murder of rivals, individuals who failed to pay for cocaine, and associates who were believed to be working as informants.

The indictment alleges that the cartel members employed the services of the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC), a right-wing paramilitary organization internationally classified as terrorist, to protect the cartel’s drug routes, its drug laboratories, and its members and associates. The AUC is one of the 37 Foreign Terrorist Organizations identified by the U.S. State Department in 2004.

Leaders of the Norte del Valle cartel allegedly bribed and corrupted Colombian law enforcement and Colombian legislators to, among other things, attempt to block the extradition of Colombian narcotics traffickers to the United States to be prosecuted for their crimes. According to the indictment, members of the Norte del Valle cartel even conducted their own wiretaps in Colombia to intercept the communications of rival drug traffickers and Colombianand United States law enforcement officials.

Sinaloa Drug Cartel is now in the Philippines (Filipinas) and Worldwide

Sinaloa Drug Cartel is now in the Philippines (Filipinas) and Worldwide

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(Pacific Cartel,
Guzmán-Loera Cartel) Founded 1989
Founding location Culiacan, Sinaloa
Years active 1989–present
Territory Mexico:
Sinaloa, Sonora, Nayarit, Chihuahua, Durango, Jalisco, Colima, Chiapas,TamaulipasGuerrero,
Zacatecas, Baja California, Baja California Sur, Oaxaca, Guanajuato, Querétaro, Tlaxcala,
Puebla, Morelos, Mexico City
United States,
Central America
South America
Ethnicity Mexican
Criminal activities Drug trafficking
Allies Gulf Cartel, Knights Templar,
Rivals Los Zetas, Juárez Cartel, Tijuana Cartel

The Sinaloa Cartel (Spanish: Cártel de Sinaloa or CDS) is a drug-trafficking and organized crime organization based in the city of Culiacán, Sinaloa, with operations in the Mexican states of Baja California, Durango, Sonora and Chihuahua. The cartel is also known as the Guzmán-Loera Organization and the Pacific Cartel, the latter due to the coast of Mexico from which it originated. The cartel has also been called the Federation and the Blood Alliance. The ‘Federation’ was partially splintered when the Beltrán-Leyva brothers broke apart from the Sinaloa Cartel.

The United States Intelligence Community considers the Sinaloa Cartel “the most powerful drug trafficking organization in the world” and in 2011, the Los Angeles Times called it as “Mexico’s most powerful organized crime group.”

The Sinaloa Cartel is associated with the label “Golden Triangle”, which refers to the states of Sinaloa, Durango, and Chihuahua. The region is a major producer of Mexican opium and marijuana. According to the U.S. Attorney General, the Sinaloa Cartel is responsible for importing into the United States and distributing nearly 200 tons of cocaine and large amounts of heroin between 1990 and 2008.
Background
Pedro Avilés Pérez was a pioneer drug lord in the Mexican state of Sinaloa in the late 1960s. He is considered to be the first generation of major Mexican drug smugglers of marijuana who marked the birth of large-scale Mexican drug trafficking. He also pioneered the use of aircraft to smuggle drugs to the United States.

Second generation Sinaloan traffickers such as Rafael Caro Quintero, Ernesto Fonseca Carrillo, Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo and Avilés Pérez’ nephew Joaquín ‘El Chapo’or “Shorty” Guzmán would claim they learned all they knew about narcotrafficking while serving in the Avilés organization. Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo, who eventually founded the Guadalajara Cartel, was arrested in 1989. While incarcerated, he remained one of Mexico’s major traffickers, maintaining his organization via mobile phone until he was transferred to a new maximum security prison in the 1990s. At that point, his old organization broke up into three factions: the Tijuana Cartel led by his nephews, the Arellano Félix brothers Cartel, and the Sinaloa Cartel, run by former lieutenants Héctor Luis Palma Salazar, Adrián Gómez González and Joaquín Guzmán Loera (El Chapo).

Leadership
Sinaloa Cartel hierarchy in early 2008The Sinaloa Cartel used to be known as La Alianza de Sangre (“Blood Alliance”). When Héctor Luis Palma Salazar (a.k.a. El Güero) was arrested on 23 June 1995, by elements of the Mexican Army, his partner Joaquín Guzmán Loera took leadership of the cartel. Guzmán was captured in Guatemala on 9 June 1993, and extradited to Mexico, where he was jailed in a maximum security prison, but on 19 January 2001, Guzmán escaped and resumed his command of the Sinaloa Cartel. Guzmán has two close associates, Ismael Zambada García and Ignacio Coronel Villareal.[20][21] Guzman and Zambada became Mexico’s top drug kingpins in 2003, after the arrest of their rival Osiel Cardenas of the Gulf Cartel. Another close associate, Javier Torres Felix, was arrested and extradited to the U.S. in December 2006;[22] so far, Guzmán and Zambada have evaded operations to capture them.

On 29 July 2010 Ignacio Coronel was killed in a shootout with the Mexican military in Zapopan, Jalisco.

OperationsThe Sinaloa Cartel has a presence in 17 Mexican states, with important centers in Mexico City, Tepic, Toluca, Zacatecas, Guadalajara, and most of the state of Sinaloa. The cartel is primarily involved in the smuggling and distribution of Colombian cocaine, Mexican marijuana, methamphetamine and Mexican and Southeast Asian heroin into the United States. It is believed that a group known as the Herrera Organization would transport multi-ton quantities of cocaine from South America to Guatemala on behalf of the Sinaloa Cartel. From there it is smuggled north to Mexico and later into the U.S. Other shipments of cocaine are believed to originate in Colombia from Cali and Medellín drug-trafficking groups from which the Sinaloa Cartel handle transportation across the U.S.border to distribution cells in Arizona, California, Texas, Chicago and New York.

Prior to his arrest, Vicente Zambada Niebla (“El Vicentillo”), son of Ismael Zambada García (“El Mayo”), played a key role in the Sinaloa Cartel. Vicente Zambada was responsible for coordinating multi-ton cocaine shipments from Central and South American countries, through Mexico, and into the United States for the Sinaloa Cartel. To accomplish this task he used every means available: Boeing 747 cargo aircraft, narco submarines, container ships, go-fast boats, fishing vessels, buses, rail cars, tractor trailers and automobiles. He was arrested by the Mexican Army on 18 March 2009 and extradited on 18 February 2010 to Chicago to face federal charges.

In the late 1980s, the United States Drug Enforcement Administration believed the Sinaloa Cartel was the largest drug trafficking organization operating in Mexico. By the mid-1990s, according to one court opinion, it was believed to be the size of the Medellín Cartel during its prime. The Sinaloa Cartel was believed to be linked to the Juárez Cartel in a strategic alliance following the partnership of their rivals, the Gulf Cartel and TijuanaCartel. Following the discovery of a tunnel system used to smuggle drugs across the Mexican/US border, the group has been associated with such means of trafficking.

By 2005, the Beltrán-Leyva brothers, who were formerly aligned with the Sinaloa Cartel, had come to dominate drug trafficking across the border with Arizona. By 2006, the Sinaloa Cartel had eliminated all competition across the 528 km of Arizona border. The Milenio (Michoacan), Jalisco (Guadalajara), Sonora (Sonora), and Colima (Colima) cartels are now branches of the Sinaloa Cartel.

In January 2008 the cartel allegedly split into a number of warring factions, which is a major cause of the epidemic of drug violence Mexico has seen in the last year.[33] Murders by the cartel often involve beheadings or bodies dissolved in vats of acid and are sometimes filmed and posted on the Internet as a warning to rival gangs.
Atlanta has been used as a major U.S. distribution center and accounting hub, and the presence of the Sinaloa Cartel there has brought ruthless violence to that area.

Arrest and seizuresOn 11 May 2008, Alfonso Gutiérrez Loera, cousin of Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera and 5 other drug traffickers were arrested after a shootout with Federal Police officers in Culiacan, Sinaloa. Along with the captured suspects, 16 assault rifles, 3 grenades, 102 magazines and 3,543 ammunition rounds were seized.
On 25 February 2009, the U.S. government announced the arrest of 750 members of the Sinaloa Cartel across the U.S. in Operation Xcellerator. They also announced the seizure of more than $59 million in cash and numerous vehicles, planes, and boats.

In March 2009, the Mexican Government announced the deployment of 1,000 Federal Police officers and 5,000 Mexican Army soldiers to restore order in Ciudad Juárez, which has suffered the highest number of casualties in the country.
On 20 August 2009, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) dismembered a large Mexican drug operation in Chicago, and uncovered a major distribution network operated by the Flores crew led by twin brothers Margarito and Pedro Flores that operated out of that city. The drug operation allegedly brought 1.5 to 2 tons of cocaine every month to Chicago from Mexico and shipped millions of dollars south of the border. The shipments were mostly bought from the Sinaloa Cartel and at times from the Beltrán-Leyva Cartel, and it is assumed that both cartels threatened the Flores crew with violence if they bought from other rival drug organizations.

The Sinaloa cartel’s loss of partners in Mexico does not appear to have affected its ability to smuggle drugs from South America to the USA. On the contrary, based on seizure reports, the Sinaloa cartel appears to be the most active smuggler of cocaine. The reports also demonstrated the cartels possess the ability to establish operations in previously unknown areas, such as Central America and South America, even as far south as Perú, Paraguay and Argentina. It also appears to be most active in diversifying its export markets; rather than relying solely on U.S. drug consumption, it has made an effort to supply distributors of drugs in Latin Americanand European countries.
Current alliancesSince February 2010, the major cartels have aligned in two factions: one integrated by the Juárez Cartel, Tijuana Cartel and Los Zetas; the other faction integrated by the Gulf Cartel and Sinaloa Cartel.In addition to maintaining its anti-Zetas alliance with the Gulf cartel, Sinaloa in 2011 affiliated itself with the Knights Templar in Michoacan, and to counter Los Zetas in Jalisco state, Sinaloa affiliated itself with the Jalisco New Generation Cartel.