Norte del Valle Colombian Drug Cartel is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

Norte del Valle Colombian Drug Cartel is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

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Norte del Valle Cartel Years active Late 1990s-present
Territory Valle del Cauca department of Colombia
Ethnicity Colombian
Criminal activities Illegal drugs trade

The Norte del Valle Cartel, or North Valley Cartel, is a drug cartel that operates principally in the north of the Valle del Cauca department of Colombia. It rose to prominence during the second half of the 1990s, after the Cali Cartel and the Medellín Cartel fragmented, and is known as one of the most powerful organizations in the illegal
drugs trade.

 

Activities
According to Diego Montoya’s Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) profile, the U.S. government accuses him of being involved in the willing production and distribution of multiple tons of cocaine into the United States. It also considers him and his organization as heavily relying on violence enjoying the protection of both right-wing and left-wing illegal armed groups classified as terrorist organizations by the U.S. government.

According to a 2004 U.S. Government Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) indictment, between 1990 and 2004, the Norte del Valle cartel exported more than 1.2 million pounds – or 500 metric tons – of cocaine worth in excess of $10 billion from Colombia to Mexico and ultimately to the United States for resale.

The indictment charges that the Norte del Valle cartel used violence and brutality to further its goals, including the murder of rivals, individuals who failed to pay for cocaine, and associates who were believed to be working as informants.

The indictment alleges that the cartel members employed the services of the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC), a right-wing paramilitary organization internationally classified as terrorist, to protect the cartel’s drug routes, its drug laboratories, and its members and associates. The AUC is one of the 37 Foreign Terrorist Organizations identified by the U.S. State Department in 2004.

Leaders of the Norte del Valle cartel allegedly bribed and corrupted Colombian law enforcement and Colombian legislators to, among other things, attempt to block the extradition of Colombian narcotics traffickers to the United States to be prosecuted for their crimes. According to the indictment, members of the Norte del Valle cartel even conducted their own wiretaps in Colombia to intercept the communications of rival drug traffickers and Colombianand United States law enforcement officials.

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Sinaloa Drug Cartel is now in the Philippines (Filipinas) and Worldwide

Sinaloa Drug Cartel is now in the Philippines (Filipinas) and Worldwide

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(Pacific Cartel,
Guzmán-Loera Cartel) Founded 1989
Founding location Culiacan, Sinaloa
Years active 1989–present
Territory Mexico:
Sinaloa, Sonora, Nayarit, Chihuahua, Durango, Jalisco, Colima, Chiapas,TamaulipasGuerrero,
Zacatecas, Baja California, Baja California Sur, Oaxaca, Guanajuato, Querétaro, Tlaxcala,
Puebla, Morelos, Mexico City
United States,
Central America
South America
Ethnicity Mexican
Criminal activities Drug trafficking
Allies Gulf Cartel, Knights Templar,
Rivals Los Zetas, Juárez Cartel, Tijuana Cartel

The Sinaloa Cartel (Spanish: Cártel de Sinaloa or CDS) is a drug-trafficking and organized crime organization based in the city of Culiacán, Sinaloa, with operations in the Mexican states of Baja California, Durango, Sonora and Chihuahua. The cartel is also known as the Guzmán-Loera Organization and the Pacific Cartel, the latter due to the coast of Mexico from which it originated. The cartel has also been called the Federation and the Blood Alliance. The ‘Federation’ was partially splintered when the Beltrán-Leyva brothers broke apart from the Sinaloa Cartel.

The United States Intelligence Community considers the Sinaloa Cartel “the most powerful drug trafficking organization in the world” and in 2011, the Los Angeles Times called it as “Mexico’s most powerful organized crime group.”

The Sinaloa Cartel is associated with the label “Golden Triangle”, which refers to the states of Sinaloa, Durango, and Chihuahua. The region is a major producer of Mexican opium and marijuana. According to the U.S. Attorney General, the Sinaloa Cartel is responsible for importing into the United States and distributing nearly 200 tons of cocaine and large amounts of heroin between 1990 and 2008.
Background
Pedro Avilés Pérez was a pioneer drug lord in the Mexican state of Sinaloa in the late 1960s. He is considered to be the first generation of major Mexican drug smugglers of marijuana who marked the birth of large-scale Mexican drug trafficking. He also pioneered the use of aircraft to smuggle drugs to the United States.

Second generation Sinaloan traffickers such as Rafael Caro Quintero, Ernesto Fonseca Carrillo, Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo and Avilés Pérez’ nephew Joaquín ‘El Chapo’or “Shorty” Guzmán would claim they learned all they knew about narcotrafficking while serving in the Avilés organization. Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo, who eventually founded the Guadalajara Cartel, was arrested in 1989. While incarcerated, he remained one of Mexico’s major traffickers, maintaining his organization via mobile phone until he was transferred to a new maximum security prison in the 1990s. At that point, his old organization broke up into three factions: the Tijuana Cartel led by his nephews, the Arellano Félix brothers Cartel, and the Sinaloa Cartel, run by former lieutenants Héctor Luis Palma Salazar, Adrián Gómez González and Joaquín Guzmán Loera (El Chapo).

Leadership
Sinaloa Cartel hierarchy in early 2008The Sinaloa Cartel used to be known as La Alianza de Sangre (“Blood Alliance”). When Héctor Luis Palma Salazar (a.k.a. El Güero) was arrested on 23 June 1995, by elements of the Mexican Army, his partner Joaquín Guzmán Loera took leadership of the cartel. Guzmán was captured in Guatemala on 9 June 1993, and extradited to Mexico, where he was jailed in a maximum security prison, but on 19 January 2001, Guzmán escaped and resumed his command of the Sinaloa Cartel. Guzmán has two close associates, Ismael Zambada García and Ignacio Coronel Villareal.[20][21] Guzman and Zambada became Mexico’s top drug kingpins in 2003, after the arrest of their rival Osiel Cardenas of the Gulf Cartel. Another close associate, Javier Torres Felix, was arrested and extradited to the U.S. in December 2006;[22] so far, Guzmán and Zambada have evaded operations to capture them.

On 29 July 2010 Ignacio Coronel was killed in a shootout with the Mexican military in Zapopan, Jalisco.

OperationsThe Sinaloa Cartel has a presence in 17 Mexican states, with important centers in Mexico City, Tepic, Toluca, Zacatecas, Guadalajara, and most of the state of Sinaloa. The cartel is primarily involved in the smuggling and distribution of Colombian cocaine, Mexican marijuana, methamphetamine and Mexican and Southeast Asian heroin into the United States. It is believed that a group known as the Herrera Organization would transport multi-ton quantities of cocaine from South America to Guatemala on behalf of the Sinaloa Cartel. From there it is smuggled north to Mexico and later into the U.S. Other shipments of cocaine are believed to originate in Colombia from Cali and Medellín drug-trafficking groups from which the Sinaloa Cartel handle transportation across the U.S.border to distribution cells in Arizona, California, Texas, Chicago and New York.

Prior to his arrest, Vicente Zambada Niebla (“El Vicentillo”), son of Ismael Zambada García (“El Mayo”), played a key role in the Sinaloa Cartel. Vicente Zambada was responsible for coordinating multi-ton cocaine shipments from Central and South American countries, through Mexico, and into the United States for the Sinaloa Cartel. To accomplish this task he used every means available: Boeing 747 cargo aircraft, narco submarines, container ships, go-fast boats, fishing vessels, buses, rail cars, tractor trailers and automobiles. He was arrested by the Mexican Army on 18 March 2009 and extradited on 18 February 2010 to Chicago to face federal charges.

In the late 1980s, the United States Drug Enforcement Administration believed the Sinaloa Cartel was the largest drug trafficking organization operating in Mexico. By the mid-1990s, according to one court opinion, it was believed to be the size of the Medellín Cartel during its prime. The Sinaloa Cartel was believed to be linked to the Juárez Cartel in a strategic alliance following the partnership of their rivals, the Gulf Cartel and TijuanaCartel. Following the discovery of a tunnel system used to smuggle drugs across the Mexican/US border, the group has been associated with such means of trafficking.

By 2005, the Beltrán-Leyva brothers, who were formerly aligned with the Sinaloa Cartel, had come to dominate drug trafficking across the border with Arizona. By 2006, the Sinaloa Cartel had eliminated all competition across the 528 km of Arizona border. The Milenio (Michoacan), Jalisco (Guadalajara), Sonora (Sonora), and Colima (Colima) cartels are now branches of the Sinaloa Cartel.

In January 2008 the cartel allegedly split into a number of warring factions, which is a major cause of the epidemic of drug violence Mexico has seen in the last year.[33] Murders by the cartel often involve beheadings or bodies dissolved in vats of acid and are sometimes filmed and posted on the Internet as a warning to rival gangs.
Atlanta has been used as a major U.S. distribution center and accounting hub, and the presence of the Sinaloa Cartel there has brought ruthless violence to that area.

Arrest and seizuresOn 11 May 2008, Alfonso Gutiérrez Loera, cousin of Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera and 5 other drug traffickers were arrested after a shootout with Federal Police officers in Culiacan, Sinaloa. Along with the captured suspects, 16 assault rifles, 3 grenades, 102 magazines and 3,543 ammunition rounds were seized.
On 25 February 2009, the U.S. government announced the arrest of 750 members of the Sinaloa Cartel across the U.S. in Operation Xcellerator. They also announced the seizure of more than $59 million in cash and numerous vehicles, planes, and boats.

In March 2009, the Mexican Government announced the deployment of 1,000 Federal Police officers and 5,000 Mexican Army soldiers to restore order in Ciudad Juárez, which has suffered the highest number of casualties in the country.
On 20 August 2009, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) dismembered a large Mexican drug operation in Chicago, and uncovered a major distribution network operated by the Flores crew led by twin brothers Margarito and Pedro Flores that operated out of that city. The drug operation allegedly brought 1.5 to 2 tons of cocaine every month to Chicago from Mexico and shipped millions of dollars south of the border. The shipments were mostly bought from the Sinaloa Cartel and at times from the Beltrán-Leyva Cartel, and it is assumed that both cartels threatened the Flores crew with violence if they bought from other rival drug organizations.

The Sinaloa cartel’s loss of partners in Mexico does not appear to have affected its ability to smuggle drugs from South America to the USA. On the contrary, based on seizure reports, the Sinaloa cartel appears to be the most active smuggler of cocaine. The reports also demonstrated the cartels possess the ability to establish operations in previously unknown areas, such as Central America and South America, even as far south as Perú, Paraguay and Argentina. It also appears to be most active in diversifying its export markets; rather than relying solely on U.S. drug consumption, it has made an effort to supply distributors of drugs in Latin Americanand European countries.
Current alliancesSince February 2010, the major cartels have aligned in two factions: one integrated by the Juárez Cartel, Tijuana Cartel and Los Zetas; the other faction integrated by the Gulf Cartel and Sinaloa Cartel.In addition to maintaining its anti-Zetas alliance with the Gulf cartel, Sinaloa in 2011 affiliated itself with the Knights Templar in Michoacan, and to counter Los Zetas in Jalisco state, Sinaloa affiliated itself with the Jalisco New Generation Cartel.

Tijuana Drug Cartel is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

Tijuana Drug Cartel is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

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Founding location Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico
Years active 1989–present
Territory Mexico:
Baja California, Baja California Sur, Sinaloa, Jalisco.
United States:
California, Nevada, Arizona, Washington
Ethnicity Mexican
Criminal activities Drug trafficking, money laundering, People smuggling, murder, arms trafficking, bribery
Allies Los Zetas, Juárez Cartel,Oaxaca Cartel
Rivals Sinaloa Cartel, Gulf Cartel

The Tijuana Cartel (Spanish: Cártel de Tijuana or Arellano-Félix Organization or Cártel Arellano Félix – CAF) is a Mexican drug cartel based in Tijuana. The cartel was described as “one of the biggest and most violent criminal groups in Mexico”.The Tijuana Cartel was featured battling the rival Juárez Cartel in the 2000 motion picture Traffic.
History
Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo, the founder of the Guadalajara Cartel was arrested in 1989. While incarcerated, he remained one of Mexico’s major traffickers, maintaining his organization via mobile phone until he was transferred to a new maximum security prison in the 1990s. At that point, his old organization broke up into two factions: the Tijuana Cartel led by his nephews, the Arellano Félix brothers, and the Sinaloa Cartel, run by former lieutenants Héctor Luis Palma Salazar and Joaquín Guzmán Loera, a.k.a. El Chapo.

Currently, the majority of Mexico’s smuggling routes are controlled by three key cartels: Gulf, Sinaloa and Tijuana —though Tijuana is the least powerful. The Tijuana cartel was further weakened in August 2006 when its chief, Javier Arellano Félix, was arrested by the U.S. Coast Guard on a boat off the coast of Baja California. Mexican army troops also were sent to Tijuana in January 2007 in an operation to restore order to the border city and root out corrupt police officers, who mostly were cooperating with the Tijuana cartel. As a result of these efforts, the Tijuana cartel is unable to project much power outside of its base in Tijuana.Much of the violence that emerged in 2008 in Tijuana was a result of conflicts within the Tijuana cartel; on one side, the faction led by Teodoro García Simental (a.k.a. El Teo) favored kidnappings. The other faction, led by Luis Fernando Sánchez Arellano (a.k.a. El Ingeniero), focused primarily on drug trafficking. The faction led by Sánchez Arellano demanded the reduction of the kidnappings in Tijuana, but his demands were rejected by García Simental, resulting in high levels of violence. Nonetheless, most of the victims in Tijuana were white-collar entrepreneurs, and the kidnappings were bringing “too much heat on organized crime” and disrupting the criminal enterprises and interests of the cartel. The Mexican federal government responded by implementing “Operation Tijuana,” a coordination carried out between the Mexican military and the municipal police forces in the area. To put down the violence, InSight Crime states that a pact was probably created between military officials and members of the Sánchez Arellano faction to eliminate Simental’s group.The U.S. authorities speculated through WikiLeaks in 2009 that Tijuana’s former police boss, Julián Leyzaola, had made agreements with Sánchez Arellano to bring relative peace in Tijuana.With the arrest of El Teo in January 2010, much of his faction was eliminated from the city of Tijuana; some of its remains went off and joined with the Sinaloa Cartel. But much of the efforts done between 2008 and 2010 in Tijuana would not have been possible without the coordination of local police forces and the Mexican military – and possibly with a cartel truce – to put down the violence.

The relative peace in the city of Tijuana in 2010–2012 has raised speculations of a possible agreement between the Tijuana Cartel and the Sinaloa Cartel to maintain peace in the area. According to Mexican and U.S. authorities, most of Tijuana is under the dominance of the Sinaloa cartel, while Luis Fernando Sánchez Arellano of the Tijuana cartel remains the “head of that puppet empire.” To be exact, experts told InSight Crime that the peace exists because Joaquín Guzmán Loera wants it that way, and argued that his organization—the Sinaloa Cartel—has spread too thin with its wars with Los Zetas and the Juárez Cartel that opening a third war would be inconvenient. The Tijuana cartel, however, has something their rivals do not have: a long-time family with business and political connections throughout the city. InSight Crime believes that this could explain why the Sinaloa cartel has left Sánchez Arellano as the figurehead, since it might be too costly for El Chapo financially and politically to make a final push. Moreover, the Tijuana cartel charges a toll (“piso”) on the Sinaloa cartel for trafficking drugs in their territory, which serves as an illustration of the Tijuana cartel’s continued hegemony as a local group. Despite the series of high-ranking arrests the cartel suffered throughout 2011–2012, its ability to maintain a highly centralized criminal infrastructure shows how difficult it is to uproot mafias who have long-established their presence in a community.

18th Street gang is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

18th Street gang is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

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18th Street Gang
18th Street Gang Graffiti
Founded 1960′s
Years active 1960′s – present
Territory Mostly in Los Angeles California, the western and southern areas of the United States, Mexico, and Central
America
Ethnicity Mostly Mexican, Central Americans
Membership 65,000
Criminal activities Drug trafficking, assault, arson, robbery, kidnapping, pandering, extortion, arms trafficking,
human trafficking, theft, murder, racketeering, illegal immigration, illegal gambling, identity document forgery and
fraud
Rivals Mara Salvatrucha, Clanton 14, Playboys gang

18th Street gang, also known as M18, Calle 18, Barrio 18, La18 or Mara-18 in Central America, is a ruthless, multi-ethnic transnational criminal organization that started as a street gang in the Rampart area of Los Angeles, California. They are considered to be the largest transnational criminal street gang in Los Angeles and it is estimated that there are tens of thousands of members in Los Angeles County alone. The FBI has documented close to 65,000 active gang members and they are active in 120 cities in 37 U.S. states.

History
18th Street gang started near 18th Street and Union Avenue in the Rampart District of Los Angeles. There is conflicting information as to the exact area, but this is a generally accepted area by most academic sources. They were originally part of Clanton 14 but wanted to make a separate clique called Clanton 18th Street and allow immigrants the opportunity to join. This proposal was rejected by the Clanton 14, which led to the formation of the 18th Street gang. The two gangs have been bitter rivals ever since. The 18th Street gang grew by expanding its membership to other nationalities and races, and it was among the first multiracial, multi-ethnic gangs in Los Angeles In the beginning, they were made up largely of second-generation Hispanic immigrants.As the 18th Street gang began to battle with more established Hispanic gangs, they began to recruit outside of the Hispanic community.There are approximately 200 separate individual autonomous gangs operating under the same name within separate barrios in the San Fernando Valley, the San Gabriel Valley, the South Bay, South Los Angeles, Downtown Los Angeles, Pico Union, Inglewood, Cudahy, and Orange County, according to the latest figures from the NDIC. In the last decade,[when?] The Federal Bureau of Investigation has initiated wide-scale raids against known and suspected gang members, netting hundreds of arrests across the country.

Location
The majority of 18th Street cliques operating throughout Southern California are the result of Los Angeles members migrating to other areas and establishing their own cliques. Members originally from Los Angeles tend to be more respected than those in other areas. Eighteenth Street has become the largest and fastest-growing gang in Oregon. Its members have tried to assert control over the state prison narcotics trade and are blamed for one of Salem’s worst gang slayings: A 15-year-old 18th Streeter, who wanted out, was gunned down by his homeboys. In El Salvador, church leaders have been working to broker a truce between 18th Street and its rivals. Authorities from Honduras, meanwhile, recently visited Los Angeles seeking advice from law enforcement on the gang. 18th Street cliques have been identified in 120 cities in 37 states and the District of Columbia in the United States, as well as Mexico, El Salvador, Honduras, Philippines, Guatemala, Canada and Australia. Some cliques are: 54th Tiny Locos, Hollywood Gangsters, Tiny Diablos, Pico Gangsters, Bellflower, 106th Block, Grand View, Hoover, Mac Arthur Park, Smile Drive, Shatto Park, South Central, Rancho Park, Freshwater, Cudahy, Baby Locas (A Females Clique), Malditos in Orange County

Asian Gangs are now in the Philippines

Asian Gangs are now in the Philippines

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Tiny Raskal Gang or TRG
Asian Boys or ABZ
White Tigers
Manace of Destruction or MOD
Wah Ching or WC

Bandidos Motorcycle Club is now in the Philippines and Worldwide

Bandidos Motorcycle Club is now in the Philippines and Worldwide

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Motto “We are the people our parents warned us about”
Founded 1966
Location San Leon, Texas
Founder Donald Eugene Chambers
Type Outlaw motorcycle club
Region Worldwide
Website www.bandidosmc.com

The Bandidos Motorcycle Club, also known as the Bandido Nation, is a “one-percenter” motorcycle gang and organized crime syndicate with a worldwide membership. The club was formed in 1966 by Don Chambers in Texas. Its motto is We are the people our parents warned us about. It is estimated to have 2,400 members in 210 chapters, located in 16 countries. The club considers itself to be an Outlaw Motorcycle Club. The Federal Bureau of Investigation as well as the Criminal Intelligence Service Canada have named the Bandidos an Outlaw Motorcycle Gang.
History
The club was formed on March 4, 1966 in San Leon, Texas by Donald Eugene Chambers. Many people think Chambers named his club the Bandidos after seeing a TV commercial with the Frito Bandito enthusiastically promoting Fritos corn chips. This is not true, as the cartoon came out in 1968 (although he did adopt an obese machete- and pistol-wielding Mexican Bandido as the center patch for the club’s colors). Don Chambers, having served in Vietnam as a Marine,modeled the club’s colors after the scarlet and gold motif of the United States Marine Corps. After Chambers’ presidency ended due to his conviction for murder in El Paso, Texas, Ronnie “Seneca” Hodge was elevated to president.
Organization


The Bandidos has over 90 chapters in the United States, 90 chapters in Europe, and another 17 in Australia and Southeast Asia. In the United States, the club is concentrated in Texas, but extends into Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas, New Mexico, Colorado, Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, Utah, Idaho, Nevada, Washington, Oklahoma, Nebraska, and several other states. The Rock Machine Motorcycle club in Canada merged with the Bandidos in 2000; there was a chapter in Toronto, Ontario until a dramatic internal conflict led to their deaths. The Bandidos are also found in Australia; aside from the non-locale-specific Nomads chapter, the chapters are located in Adelaide, Ballarat, Brisbane (Bayside, Centro, City), Byron Bay, Cairns, Geelong, Gold Coast, Hunter Valley, Ipswich, Melbourne, Mid North Coast, Mid State, Mission Beach, Noosa, North Victoria, Northside, Sunshine Coast, Sydney, and Toowoomba, and were acquired with much bloodletting. In recent years the club has also expanded heavily into Germany, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Belgium, Italy, Luxembourg, France and the Channel Islands. Additionally, it is looking into setting up shop in Russia and Eastern Europe and also in Singapore, Malaysia, Philippines and Thailand. The Bandidos are organized by local chapters, with state and regional officers, as well as a national chapter made up of four regional vice presidents and a national president.

Like the Hells Angels, The Bandidos also have a number of puppet, or so-called “support,” clubs, who are used as proxies for both legal and illegal activities. These groups usually wear reverse colors (gold border with red background rather than the Bandidos’ red-border–and–gold background). They also commonly wear a unique patch (known as the “Heart Patch”) consisting of a round patch in Bandidos colors on the front upper left of the colors (vest), as worn by the member. Most of these clubs are regional.

Trinitario / Trinitarios or 3ni DPL Gang is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

Trinitario / Trinitarios or 3ni DPL Gang is now in the Philippines (Filipinas)

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Trinitario
Founded 1989
Founding locatio New York City Department of Corrections
Territory New York City, Upstate New York, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Hudson
County, Philadelphia, New Jersey, Boston, Hartford, Bridgeport, Providence, Miami, Orlando, Tampa, Spain
Ethnicity Hispanic (Primarily Dominican)
Membership 25,000 worldwide
Criminal activities Drug Trafficking, Weapons trafficking, Assault, Witness intimidation, Murder, Robberies
Rivals Dominicans Don’t Play, United Blood Nation, Latin Kings

The Trinitarios or 3ni are a violent New York-based multinational organization composed of Hispanics.Trinitario was established in 1989 within the New York State prison system[2] and since spilled into the streets, with chapters in all five boroughs of New York City. Reports of Trinitario activity have also been made in New Jersey, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Alaska, Spain, and the Dominican Republic. In Long Island places like Freeport, Brentwood, and Port Jefferson Station have a 3ni presence. It is considered the fastest-growing gang in New York, recruiting members from high schools local to the gang’s area of activity, with the highest numbers of reports coming from Chelsea, Gramercy Park, Harlem, the Morris Heights section of The Bronx and Washington Heights.[Their slogan is “Dios, Patria, y Libertad”, which means “God, Fatherland, and Liberty”.Trinitario is a Hispanic organization formed in prison, providing protection and unity for Hispanic inmates within the New York City Department of Corrections. The name “Trinitario” means the Trinity Brotherhood in Spanish. The public wrongly associates their name with La Trinitaria secret society that served as the keystone in the quest for independence in the Dominican Republic. Members view themselves as being, like the founding fathers, freedom fighters and protectors for Hispanic people, though in this case within the New York City Department of Corrections.It was originally composed of members of smaller, now-defunct Hispanic gangs such as Los Papi Chulos, Dominican Power, and Dominican Posse, as well as unaffiliated drug dealers. Many members remained affiliated with the gang after serving their sentences, and began recruiting in their neighborhoods, the path many prison gangs take as they become street gangs.

They are known (as featured on an episode of Gangland) for the use of the machete as their weapon of choice.

Locations and Membership

About 30,000 members worldwide (France, Philippines, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Dominican Republic etc.). One of the largest street gangs in NYC with over 10,000 members, and 10,000 more in other states like Florida, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Alaska, and Pennsylvania.

Extension

Trinitarios is one of New York City’s most violent and fastest rising street gangs. With their reach spreading into neighboring New Jersey and beyond, these machete-welding Latino gangsters are now battling older, more established gangs, like the Latin Kings and Bloods, for control of the streets and the lucrative east coast drug market. What started as a prison gang has now become a dominant presence in the boroughs and the suburbs; as they prey on communities in the Tri-State area, Trinitarios are quickly rising on the radar of law enforcement agencies.According to New York Law Enforcement, the Trinitarios are the fastest growing gang in New York. According to the DEA and the NYPD they may be considered the toughest gang in NYC.According to the FBI National Gang Assessment for 2010, the Trinitarios have become a threat on the East Coast.[2] In addition, they have become an emerging gang in the New England area.

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